Book Review. Kingdom of the Wicked by Kerri Maniscalco, 3.5 Stars

Warning: Contains minor spoilers. Check out my Reading Ranting page for more.

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.

Another Hades and Persephone adaptation. That’s like the 5th I’ve read this year. But that’s not a criticism of this book, purely a comment that I clearly have a type. Lol. Anyway, I generally liked this book for the magic and its characters and interesting places, but I got confused a bit too often. Maybe it was just me.

What I liked…

Firstly, I absolutely love that it’s set in alternative historical Sicily with lots of Italian names and… Love me some limoncello. I found myself getting hungry in virtually every other scene because Emilia’s parents owned a restaurant, which was based on a real restaurant in the author’s life. Extra fun.

Also, Emilia… My name. I never see my name in books I like, so this was fun. Not that it matters. Just a personal thing. 

I loved that the main parts of the magic system weren’t particularly complicated. Witches can cast spells and demons can be summoned. With some variations and specific rules here and there, that was the gist of it. Also, gates to Hell and Hell Princes… again nothing complicated to wrap my head around.

What I did/didn’t like…

Wrath was a confusing fellow, especially at the end (no spoilers on that). I think that made him even more interesting, but I would have liked some of his and Emilia’s nicer moments to last a little longer. I didn’t feel the excitement of a pending romance with these two. Still, it worked on the whole. I dunno. Maybe m

What I didn’t like…

The existence of Hades confused me (even though it’s a Hades and Persephone story) since I thought it was more Christianity with some pagan goddesses for the witches. But Hades didn’t seem to fit into it except for one artifact.

The story felt slow to start and got a bit confusing along the way. I found it hard to keep track of why random Princes were showing up because Emilia didn’t question it. I think that would have helped me more if she had mused, even if she was wrong. It was just all a bit too random until the last moment, by then, I’d forgotten the earlier events because I was trying so hard to make sense of the current ones.

Final thoughts…

I would recommend this book to readers who like Hades and Persephone adaptations, witches and spells, demons, and limoncello. And I will definitely be reading book 2. That’s going to be on December’s TBR list. Or sooner, since I’m really curious to know what happens next.

Killing Characters!

Someone has to die in fantasy fiction, right? But why?

Two main reasons for me are…

1 – To have an effect on another character. 

It could be an inciting incident near the beginning of the book. 

It also works to weaken the character just as they’re close to their goals. 

Or, it could send the character spiralling, and another character is forced to step up and prove themselves.

2 – To remind readers of the stakes.

There are so many god-like characters with seemingly unlimited powers these days. They’re immortal, invicible, and this means they can’t die, so there are no stakes.

Killing off a significant character early on makes it clear that they do have weaknesses, and readers feel that threat better.

Sure, some are resurrected or found in the underworld, which is a whole different story.

I don’t mind when it’s an instant resurrection or when the MC goes on a quest to the underworld to get their loved one. But I hate when a deceased character suddenly pops up out of nowhere. 

I’m currently pondering a character’s death myself. It’s a complicated one in that I could use their POV in this limbo that they’re stuck in, or I could have another character sense them so it’s obvious to readers that they’re not fully dead.

I’ve discussed it with others, and I’m still undecided. But I will make it clear right after the supposed death that the character it not entirely dead. That way, I don’t annoy readers with a random resurrection. 

Image by Lothar Dieterich from Pixabay 

Book Review. Blood and Honey by Shelby Mahurin. 4 stars.

Warning: Content may contain minor spoilers. Check out my Reading Ranting page for more reviews and thoughts on reading.

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I really enjoyed this book. It wasn’t quite as captivating as the first in the series, but I would happily read the next book.

What I liked…

Louis and Reid started off pretty strong in this as they reevaluated their relationship as witch and ex witch hunter-turned-witch. Wow. That was fun to see how Reid dealt with that. 

I enjoyed seeing more magical characters in this one and a new form of magic with Coco’s aunt. It made for a richer world. 

Lou struggles with her magic in this book having lost pieces of herself to it at the end of book 1. It’s like an addiction for her, a way to manipulate what she doesn’t like into something she does like. Nicely done methinks.

I love the journeys to get more allies. Having already failed to defeat Morganne, they need all the help they can get. Also, it created more tension as to whether the various other groups would actually help. Minor spoiler… Reid already f**cked up in that sense from his time as a witch hunter. Oops.

But what they really need is to prove Lou is worthy of taking her mother’s place if they defeat her, and that’s Lou’s biggest inner struggle. 

As in book 1, the love scenes were nicely done. Oblivious but on the delicate side considering this book is categorised YA. Or maybe it’s NA. Either way, it gets mentioned a lot as YA, so who knows?. It also suited the characters and their emotions at the time. 

Image  by damar9 at Deviantart.

What I didn’t like…

Reid felt a little dramatic sometimes, maybe a bit bratty, even for YA/NA whatever it’s categorised as.

Anyway, I absolutely love this book and the entire series since I’ve finished book 3 now. I love witches, fun magic systems, wild adventures, and complex characters. This whole series ticked every box of things I love in a book as well as that je ne sai quoi. Lol. French. Oh, and I especially loved the French influence.

Book Review. A Strange Hymm, The Bargainer #2 by Laura Thalassa, 4 stars.

Warning: Some reviews contain minor spoilers, but I keep the best parts vague. Check out my Reading Ranting page for more reviews and thoughts on reading.

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I was so excited to read book 2 of the The Bargainer series after I loved the 1st book so much. This didn’t disappoint.

Callie has to deal with her changes in magic, the permanent wings and scales that make it near impossible to go back to the human world. But she has Des, The Bargainer, Night King, and mate. I thought I’d get sick of the mate trope, but this is done a little differently since they have a history. 

I almost miss the flashbacks to when she first knew Des before he left her for seven years. Even though we got the explanation for that, I think forcing that separation made it more acceptable, at least from a fantasy fiction perspective. What’s a few hundred years in age when you’re practically immortal? 

I also love how we see more of the Otherworld in this book. I love fantastical worlds, and since Callie’s from Earth, albeit an alternative one, she’s seeing the Otherworld for the 1st time along with me, which adds to the wonder.

And I love the mystery. Sometimes, I thought surely Callie would have figured it out sooner with her being a PI, but… makes for better suspense as a reader.

Des and Callie are one steamy couple. Despite the massive age gap, she’s an experienced adult that knows what she’s getting into with him. Also, the balance of their magic fits, his darkness, her shiny siren. I love sirens.

What I liked…

  • I like how Callie is realistically traumatised from her experience with the King of Fauna, but she stays pretty strong considering.
  • I love how her wings are feathered while Des’ are webbed. I just love wings.
  • I liked how Callie dealt with her wings and scales. She could have outright hated them all the time, or slowly accepted them. The latter was done nicely since Des’ love of them helped her accept them. 
  • I liked how they knew things weren’t over with the Theif of Souls since none of the sleeping women were waking up. 
  • Callie’s dreams were also a good way to keep the bigger story in the forefront of the reader’s mind while having some good character developmental scenes.

What I didn’t like… again not much here.

  • Temper’s dramatic appearance felt a smidge overdone and not foreshadowed as well as it could have been
  • Again, writing could have been better. Lots of repetitive wording and structures that could have easily been avoided with the right editor.

I loved this book all the way through. If you like faeries with wings, an Earth and high fantasy world combo, sexy men with wings, sirens, lots of smut, and fun times mixed into a bigger plot, then you’ll love this book. 

Stay tuned for the final book, Dark Harmony. And I’ll get to Emperor of Evening Stars at some point.

Book Review. A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J. Maas. 5 Stars.

Warning: Some reviews contain spoilers. Check out my Reading Ranting page for more.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

This is the 2nd round of reading this book. I read them when they first came out a few years ago, but I’d forgotten so many details and small story parts that it felt like someone had told me about it and I was reading it properly for the first time.

It’s a retelling of Beauty and the Beast at its core, but it’s so much more. Feyre causes her own fate rather than being the victim of someone else’s actions. She’s hardened before the story even starts, so I immediately liked that in her. 

The BatB adaptation shows again when she realizes there’s a curse on Tamlin and his spring court servants. But unlike the original, it’s a mystery that nobody talks much about. 

Feyre takes it upon herself to find out what’s going on and do something about it. And the plot thickens when she meets a tall dark and handsome, but dangerous, stranger just for him to show up at the spring court the next day. 

I liked how this prompts Tamlin to take action, and the rest… definitely not what I expected.

By the end, I was emotionally spent even though I knew where the book was going.

Things I liked…

  • I like how Feyre isn’t some weakling from the start. Sure, she’s human, but she’s got skills already. 
  • I like that it’s a “chosen one” that’s earned by her own actions rather than some unseen power that randomly decides.
  • Characterisation. It’s hard to do in a single POV, but Sarah pulls it off.
  • Lots of characters moments between bigger plot moments. It moves nicely without being rushed. 
  • Tamlin and Lucien are curious characters at the beginning. Their permanent masks make for instant curiosity.
  • I liked the tension between Feyre and Tamlin and how their relationship evolved.
  • I love the differences between how Tamlin and Rhys behave towards Feyre under the mountain. 
  • Having already read the books, I saw the wonderful preparation for book 2. I think I misjudged things first time around.

Things I didn’t like…

  • That it ended. 

There’s a reason I reread this series, and I love it even more than the 1st time. 

Book Review. The Bridge Kingdom by Danielle L. Jensen. 4.5 Stars

Warning: Some reviews contain spoilers. Check out my Reading Ranting page for more.

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

I got serious Pirates of the Caribbean vibes in most of this book, but a completely different story. It’s low fantasy in that it’s a completely imaginary world, but there’s no magic. 

I loved how Lara started off in this book. She has a plan to take down a kingdom in order to save her own. She goes from the dry desert to a stormy group of islands to marry a King she’s never met. 

I also live how we get Aren’s POV too and see how he needs the alliance with Lara to bring trade to his people. Mostly, I love how we instantly see that he’s not what she was expecting and we just have to watch while she works that out.

The details of how Lara adjusts to the weather really brings the world to life. And her slow realization is nicely done. She’s been lied to all her life, and her only purpose is ruining Aren’s kingdom. 

It’s also fun that he learns that she’s a spy and Falls for her anyway, makes the betrayal that much sweeter. 

Art by theclever.crow

Things I liked…

  • Lara and Aren were fun to read as they slowly fall for each other.
  • The love scenes were nicely written. A perfect balance of emotion and explicitly.
  • The world was fantastic with the bridge and islands and swashbuckling theme.
  • Lara was likable despite being pretty cold from the start. She has her reasons.

What I didn’t like…

  • I’m being super picky with this, but some small technical things in the writing bugged me. But not really enough to bring down my rating. 
  • Despite really enjoying the book, it didn’t 100% captivate me, but that’s a personal thing that I can’t really explain, hence the 4.5 stars and not a full 5. 

I definitely recommend this book to anyone who likes low fantasy and romance with kingdom politics and trained assassins.

Shadows

I once walked in the dark, a shadow of the woman I used to be.

More shadows followed me, fears and unfulfilled desires.

I became the shadows, chasing what I thought I wanted.

Time taught me to let go and stop chasing.

But now you’re my shadow, watching when I no longer want you.

You pushed me over the edge and watched me fall.

But I didn’t hit the ground. 

I flew despite everything.

You have no right to watch me soar.

This is my flight, not yours.

And my shadows are far below me as the glorious sun warms my wings.

So to you, my darkest shadow, you no longer darken my flight.

Image by mohamed Hassan from Pixabay